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STUDYWORLD STUDYNOTES:

CLASSIC LITERATURE ANALYSIS

STUDYWORLD REPORTS & ESSAYS

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Antigone
Novel Summary
Character Profiles
Metaphor Analysis
Theme Analysis
Top Ten Quotes
Biography
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Antigone



Metaphor Analysis

Chorus: The chorus symbolizes two distinct features of Greek society. First, it represents the prevailing tide of public opinion. At first, the chorus rejects Antigone's belief in divine justice over state justice, but by the end of the play, especially after being advised by Teiresias, the chorus changes positions and sides with Antigone. Secondly, Sophocles uses the chorus to symbolize the consciences of the characters. Sometimes the chorus seems to reveal the inner thoughts of Creon; other times, it reveals Antigone's logic. Also, the chorus is best able to state the views of the author, Sophocles. Toward the end of the play, when the chorus attacks arrogance, Sophocles himself comes very close to speaking to Athens, citing its arrogance as cause for potential problems.

The birds/ravens: Teiresias cites the flesh-eating birds as signs that the gods' wrath is upon Thebes. Sightings of ravens and other birds were deeply significant in Greek culture; usually this was a sign from the gods, often the foreshadowing of tragedy.

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