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The Sun Also Rises
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The Sun Also Rises

Select a Chapter:
Book I - Chapters I - II
Book I - Chapters III - IV
Book I - Chapters V - VII
Book II - Chapters VIII - IX
Book II - Chapter X
Book II - Chapters XI - XII
Book II - Chapter XIII
Book II - Chapters XIV - XV
Book II - Chapters XVI - XVII
Book II - Chapter XVIII
Book III - Chapter XIX
 
Book I - Chapters I - II

Chapter I

The Sun Also Rises begins with a brief description of Robert Cohn, and Jake Barnes's early relationship with him in Paris. Jake Barnes is the narrator, and he explains that Cohn had been a boxing champion at Princeton, and that this title mattered a great deal to Cohn.� Cohn, who is Jewish, had not encountered anti-Semitism until college, and Jake says that this prejudice had made him bitter.� Boxing became a way for Cohn to deal with that bitterness.� Cohn had married after college, but the marriage did not succeed, and he began pursuing a literary career.� Eventually, Cohn had become editor of a literary review but had been forced to close it when it became expensive.� But Frances, the woman who became interested in him in the process, had convinced him to come to Europe to write.� Cohn meets Jake in Europe, where they play tennis together.� Jake depicts Frances as a woman who wants to quickly marry Cohn, and who is concerned that she might be getting too old to keep Cohn's attention.�

 

Chapter II

Cohn finishes his novel and returns to New York when it is published.� When he comes back, Jake notices that Cohn has changed, and that the attention he received from women in New York has damaged his relationship with Frances.� Apart from the attention, Cohn also had won money playing bridge, and had read a book that provided an unrealistic picture of foreign travel, The Purple Land by W.H. Hudson.� The book convinces Cohn that he should visit South America.� He has become bored with Paris, and wants to go somewhere where things happen.���

 

Analysis, Chapters I - II

Jake's portrait of Cohn is interesting because it is complex and ambiguous.� Jake seems capable of genuine admiration for Cohn, as in his boxing ability, and perhaps even sympathy, but these things are often overcome by his frustration and annoyance with Cohn.� Cohn will almost become the antagonist of the novel, with an understanding of the world that is quite different from Jake's, Brett's, and many others.� These first two chapters depict some of the things that Jake considers important parts of that difference.� Cohn has an inflated ego, and Jake works against that from the first page.�

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