Across the horizon: the rising sun and endless possibilities
 
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Home - Studyworld Studynotes - Quotes - Reports & Essays 

 

STUDYWORLD STUDYNOTES:

CLASSIC LITERATURE ANALYSIS

STUDYWORLD REPORTS & ESSAYS

RESEARCH AND IDEA DATABASE




Oakwood Publishing Company:

SAT; ACT; GRE

Study Material


xx

 



 



Novel Summary
Character Profiles
Metaphor Analysis
Theme Analysis
Top Ten QuotesBiography
Next
Previous



 

Act 1 scene 1

The opening scene takes place on the streets of Rome. The common folk are milling around, and the tribune Flavius tells them to go home. (In Ancient Rome, a tribune was an officer who protected the interests of the lower class or common people.) Flavius says that it is not a public holiday, and if the men are on the streets they should be displaying the signs of their profession. He interrogates two men. The first says he is a carpenter, but the second man is in a playful mood and does not answer Flavius directly. Eventually it transpires that he is a cobbler, and in answer to why he is out on the streets and not in his shop, the cobbler replies that they are all out to see Caesar, who has just returned after defeating Pompey's sons in battle. The crowd wants to rejoice in his triumph.  

The second tribune, Murellus, is impatient with the crowd. He reminds them that not so long ago they were celebrating the triumphs of Pompey. He says that Romans should not celebrate Roman triumphs over other Romans, and he sends the workers home.  

After the mob has gone, Flavius expresses contempt for the fickleness of the common folk. Then he tells Marellus to go about the city and remove any crowns that have been placed on the statues of Caesar. By limiting his public acclamation, they will help to prevent Caesar from growing too powerful.    

Analysis

This scene introduces a major theme of the play: how easily the common people can change their opinions, and how important it is for the politicians to ensure that the mob is on their side. The scene also hints that in spite of the popular acclaim for Caesar, there are some in Rome, such as the two tribunes, who fear that Caesar will become too powerful and they will lose their freedoms. This foreshadows the assassination plot that is soon to develop.  

PreviousNext







 



Teacher Ratings: See what

others think

of your teachers



Copy Right