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Cymbeline
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Cymbeline

Top Ten Quotes

1. "Is there no way for men to be, but women
Must be half-workers?" Act 2, scene 4, lines 153-54

Posthumus, who believes his wife is unfaithful, regrets that men need women at all.

2. "There be many Caesars
Ere such another Julius. Britain is
A world by itself, and we will nothing pay
For wearing our own noses." Act 3, scene 1, lines 12-14

Cloten expresses his contempt for the idea that Britons should pay a tribute to Rome.

3. "O, for a horse with wings!" Act 3, scene 2, line 49

Imogen wishes she could instantly be reunited with her husband, who is in a distant town.

4. "What should we speak of
When we are old as you? When we shall hear
The rain and wind beat dark December, how,
In this our pinching cave, shall we discourse
The freezing hours away?" Act 3, scene 3, lines 35-38

Arviragus laments to his adoptive father Belarius his lack of experience of the world beyond the cave in the Welsh hills where they live.

5. "To lapse in fullness
Is sorer than to lie for need, and falsehood
Is worse in kings than beggars." Act 3, scene 6, lines 12-14

Imogen reflects that prosperous people who lie commit a greater sin than poor people who lie out of need.

6. "Great griefs, I see, med'cine the less." Act 4, scene 2, line 243

After Imogen's supposed death and Cloten's real death, Belarius says that heavy sorrows put the lesser ones into perspective.

7. "Though mean and mighty, rotting
Together, have one dust, yet reverence
(That angel of the world) doth make distinction
Of place 'tween high, and low." Act 4, scene 2, lines 246-49

Belarius observes that though in death all men, poor and powerful, come to the same dust, yet the custom of reverence, the power that keeps peace in the world, accords more respect to the powerful.

8. "Thersites' body is as good as Ajax's,
When neither are alive." Act 4, scene 2, lines 252-53

Guiderius states his opinion that the mean and the mighty are due equal treatment when dead.

9. "Fear no more the heat o' th' sun,
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Though thy worldy task hast done,
Home art gone and ta'en thy wages
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney-sweepers, come to dust." Act 4, scene 2, lines 258-263

The funeral dirge for Imogen, sung by Guiderius.

10. "Hang there like fruit, my soul
Till the tree die." Act 5, scene 5, lines 263-64

Posthumus's words to his wife Imogen when they are finally reunited.

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