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\Studyworld\ Studyworld Studynotes \ Slaughterhouse-Five:
Chapter 8

Howard W. Campbell Jr. came to visit the Americans at the slaughterhouse to invite them to join "The Free American Corps," a German military unit which would only fight the Russians. He was wearing a cowboy/nazi outfit and spoke of American patriotism. "You're going to have to fight the Communists sooner or later. Why not get it over with now," Campbell said. The only man to respond was Derby, who called him lower than a snake. Dresden's air-raid sirens howled. It was the next night Dresden's 135,000 people would die. Billy became unstuck in time to his fight with his daughter Barbara, who blamed her dad's behavior on his friendship with Kilgore Trout. Trout, who lives in a rented basement in Ilium two miles from Billy's house, really made a living as a circulation man for the Ilium Gazette, managing newspaper delivery boys. One day in 1964, Billy pulled his Cadillac up to Trout, who was trying to talk a boy out of quitting. He called the boy a "gutless wonder," which was the name of a book he wrote about a robot with bad breath who had no conscience and could drop burning jellied gasoline on humans. No one held it against him, but they didn't like his bad breath. The boy decided to take a walk, leaving Trout to deliver his route. Billy introduced himself as a fan and they delivered the route together. Trout had never met a fan before. He had gotten one letter from Eliot Rosewater. Trout thought he was a 14-year old. Billy invited Trout to his 18th wedding anniversary.
At the party, Trout talked to Maggie White, a pretty dental assistant, and told her about his writing. She thought everything he wrote had to be true and he scared her by talking about hell. The Febs performed "That Old Gang of Mine"-Billy had an oddly strong emotional reaction. People became concerned, but Billy insisted that he was fine and gave Valencia a jewelry box. The Febs performed another song, and Billy had the same reaction. He rushed to the upstairs bathroom but his son was in there. He went to his bed and turned on Magic Fingers. He thought about the effect of the quartet. When Dresden was destroyed, four German guards watched the Americans in the meat locker. The rest of the guards had gone home to their families. They died. The girls they had walked in on were dead too. Once on Tralfamadore, Montana was pregnant and asked Billy to tell her a story. He told her about the guards and how they resembled a barbershop quartet. Destroyed Dresden resembled the moon and the men had to walk over the debris to get to food and water outside of the city. American fighters saw Billy and the others moving and shot at them, but they missed. At nightfall they reached a suburban inn. It was empty. There were no refugees from Dresden but them. The blind innkeeper told the 100 Americans that they could stay in the stable that night. "Good night Americans. Sleep well."

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