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Studyworld Studynotes
\Studyworld\ Studyworld Studynotes \ Julius Caesar:
Scenes 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4

Scene 2.2 - Caesar's house
Caesar sends a servant out to bring advice from his priests because Calpurnia has had dreams that Caesar will be murdered. She tells him not to go out today. Caesar tries to comfort her with a show of bravery. He says that people only threaten him when his back is turned because no one has the nerve to challenge him to his face. Calpurnia then brings up all the strange occurrences that have been happening as of late. Caesar accepts that if the gods wish him to die, he can't do anything about it - besides, no one can say for sure that the signs are meant for him. Calpurnia believes that heaven sends down bad signs only when important people will die. Caesar says that death is inevitable and that he is not afraid of dying. The servant comes back saying that the priests advise him to stay in his house today because it is too dangerous outside. Caesar brags that he is Danger's older and more threatening brother. Calpurnia begs him to stay. Caesar relents and will tell Mark Antony that he is sick.
Decius enters to take him to the senate house. Since Decius will see that Caesar is lying if he says that he is too sick to go out today, Caesar simply tells him that he will not go. Decius presses him for a reason, and Caesar mentions that his wife had a vision of people bathing in his blood. Decius reinterprets the dream as meaning the people will gain new life under Caesar's rule. Decius warns that if Caesar doesn't go to the senate house today, they might change their mind about offering him the crown. Caesar agrees to go. The rest of the conspirators enter to escort him to the senate house. Caesar is surprised by so many coming to greet him, but he assumes that this is just part of the ceremony. Antony joins up with them. Caesar walks away cheerfully, but Brutus whispers to himself that he feels guilty for tricking his friend.

Scene 2.3 - A street near the Capitol
Artemidorus proofreads a letter he wrote to Caesar warning him of the conspiracy and all the names of those involved. He intends to give it to Caesar as he enters the senate house (pretending that it is a harmless petition so that none of the conspirators suspect it) and hopes that he will read it.

Scene 2.4 - Brutus' house
Portia is frantic, and tells Brutus' servant Lucius to run to the senate house to find out how Brutus is and report it back to her. The soothsayer enters. Portia asks him if he knows what will happen to Caesar. He is not sure, but he is afraid of what might happen. The soothsayer goes to get in a position to warn Caesar. Portia rushes back inside and sends Lucius off.

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Historical Context
Main Characters
Points to Ponder
Did You Know
Plot Summary
Scene 1.1
Scene 1.2
Scene 1.3
Scene 2.1
Scenes 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4
Scene 3.1
Scenes 3.2 and 3.3
Scene 4.1
Scene 4.2
Scenes 5.1 and 5.2
Scene 5.3
Scenes 5.4 and 5.5


 

 



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