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\Studyworld\ Studyworld Studynotes \ Dracula:
Chapter 13

Seward, Van Helsing, Holmwood, and Quincey Morris attend the double funeral of Lucy and Mrs. Westenra; all the men comment on how unnaturally lifelike her corpse seems. Van Helsing takes the precaution of putting garlic flowers in Lucy's coffin and of placing a gold crucifix on her mouth. He tells Seward that they must cut off the corpse's head and take out her heart before she's buried; since Van Helsing still refuses to explain his reasons, Seward protests. The question is decided for them the next day, when they discover that one of the maids has stolen the crucifix; Van Helsing says the operation is useless now. Mrs. Westenra left all her property to Arthur Holmwood, but he is still broken-hearted over his fianc´┐Że's death.

Mina Harker's journal resumes: Mina and Jonathan are returning to their home in London after attending Mr. Hawkins' funeral. Suddenly, the sight of a man in the street he thinks is Count Dracula terrifies Jonathan. Jonathan still can't remember the details of his ordeal in Transylvania, but Mina decides she must read his journal, which she has kept sealed, and discover the truth. When Mina and Jonathan arrive at home, they find a telegram telling them of Lucy and Mrs. Westenra's deaths.

Dr. Seward's journal picks up the story here. Holmwood tells Seward, Morris, and Van Helsing that he feels truly married to Lucy since he donated his blood to her; the others don't have the heart to tell him that they did the same. After Van Helsing and Seward leave together, Van Helsing has a hysterical laughing fit and explains to Seward that it was caused by the "cruel irony" of Holmwood's situation. With Lucy's death, Seward decides to close his journal forever, marking the end of this chapter in his life. This chapter of the novel concludes with two newspaper clippings describing the haunting of a London suburb by a mysterious "bloofer lady" who lures small children away during the night. One child is found with marks on its throat and in a weak and emaciated condition.

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Historical Context
Main Characters
Points to Ponder
Did You Know
Plot Summary
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5 and 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9 and 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14 and 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19 and 20
Chapter 21
Chapter 22
Chapter 23
Chapter 24 and 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27


 

 



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