Across the horizon: the rising sun and endless possibilities
 
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Studyworld Studynotes
\Studyworld\ Studyworld Studynotes \ Catch-22:
Chapter 35 and 36

Chapter 35 - Milo the Militant
Yossarian prays that Nately will not volunteer to fly more than seventy missions, as that will make it more likely that they all will have to follow suit. Nately is steadfast; if he doesn't fly more missions, they'll send him home, and he will never see his beloved prostitute again. Nately agrees not to act until Yossarian has a chance to talk to Milo, who goes immediately to see Colonel Cathcart.

Milo asks the Colonel to allow him to fly more combat missions, as he feels he has not been living up to the standard set by the other men. He has flown a total of five, counting the one where he bombed his own squadron. The Colonel reluctantly agrees, and Milo decides to hand over control of the syndicate to the Colonel. However, after only a few minutes of explanation, the Colonel finds the syndicate far too complicated, and insists that Milo is the only one who can run it.

The solution arrived at is that someone else will fly missions for which Milo will get the credit; that person, of course, is Nately, who wants to fly more missions. On the very next mission, however, Nately is killed.



Chapter 36 - The Cellar
On the news of Nately's death, the Chaplain runs to the base. Before he has a chance to talk to Yossarian, he is accosted by MP's, placed in a car, and driven away. He is taken down to a dark, frightening interrogation room underground, where a panel of men (not unlike the one that interrogated Clevinger), attempts to prove him guilty of signing Washington Irving on letters.

The interrogation is at times terrifying and at times comic, but in the end, of course, they find the Chaplain guilty without proving anything. Once he is found guilty, he is inexplicably released freely and can return to the base. Enraged by these violations of his rights, he confronts Colonel Korn with newfound backbone on the issue of the number of missions the men are required to fly. Colonel Korn simply thanks him for his input and ignores him.

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Chapter 1
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Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11 and 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14, 15, and 16
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Chapter 18
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Chapter 23
Chapter 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26 and 27
Chapter 28 and 29
Chapter 30 and 31
Chapter 32 and 33
Chapter 34
Chapter 35 and 36
Chapter 37 and 38
Chapter 39
Chapter 40 and 41
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