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\Studyworld\ Studyworld Studynotes \ Catch-22:
Chapter 3

Chapter 3 - Orr
In their tent, Yossarian and Orr engage in a frustratingly circular conversation. Orr tells his tentmate that when he way a boy, he liked to keep crab apples in his cheeks. When Yossarian asks why, he replies only that they are better than horse chestnuts. Orr also refuses to clear up another matter that has been baffling Yossarian; why, several months earlier, he had been hit repeatedly on the head by a prostitute in a Rome brothel. Yossarian struggles not to ask Orr any more questions, because he knows Orr will only answer with bizarre, inconclusive remarks. At the close of their discussion, Yossarian does learn that Orr kept crab apples in his mouth in an attempt to develop big cheeks.

The author goes on to describe an ongoing rivalry between General Peckem, a maniac for neatness and appearance, and General Dreedle, a maniac for efficiency and military practicality. In a characteristic squabble, Peckem orders that all tents in the squadron be pitched facing the Washington Monument, an idea which infuriates Dreedle. Both furiously correspond with headquarters, but Peckem's letters are thrown in the trash by the mail clerk, ex-PFC Wintergreen, who does so because he finds Peckem's correspondence to be "too prolix." In this manner, Dreedle wins out.

In order to regain some standing, Peckem begins sending an inordinate number of USO performing groups to the squadron. The man in charge of drumming up enthusiasm for these shows is his underling, Colonel Cargill. Cargill is a former marketing executive who, before the war, was so incompetent at marketing, that major corporations would retain his services when they wanted to show a loss of income for tax reasons. Despite his efforts to raise enthusiasm, many of the men are caught in a constant state of stress and panic. They shuffle around waiting for the orders to come in that will send them home, but worry that the minimum number of missions will be raised before those orders arrive.

Towards the end of the chapter, Yossarian visits Doc Daneeka again, who reminds Yossarian that he's not the only one with problems. Daneeka complains repeatedly of his struggle through medical school, his struggle to make his practice profitable, and finally of his being drafted into the armed forces just as he was beginning to make money.

Yossarian then reflects on the differences between his style as bombardier, and that of Havermeyer. Yossarian, wishing only to return safely from each mission, banks and dives like an insane man, giving the Germans no chance to concentrate their anti-aircraft fire, but also making it impossible for him to hit any ground targets (or to even observe whether he is hitting them). Havermeyer, on the other hand, flies straight and level on his way to the target, and continues to do so at great peril to his crew in order that he can see whether or not he has hit his targets. Havermeyer is praised by his superiors as the best bombardier in the squadron, but his men hate to fly with him.

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Chapter 1
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Chapter 3
Chapter 4
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Chapter 6
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Chapter 8
Chapter 9
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Chapter 11 and 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14, 15, and 16
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Chapter 26 and 27
Chapter 28 and 29
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Chapter 39
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