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Chapter 24

Chapter 24 - Milo
This chapter details the continued development of Milo's syndicate. Using bribery, influence, and a good sales pitch, Milo's expands his operations to unbelievable proportions. He convinces generals to give him his own planes, which he paints white with his own "M & M" logo on the fuselage. Soon he even has German planes in his fleet. When the Americans try to confiscate them, he hides behind arguments about free enterprise and private property.

Soon Milo hires out his planes to both the Germans and the Americans for combat missions. He takes payment from both sides, and then assists both the attackers and the defenders, all at great profit for the syndicate, in which everyone has a share. It becomes clear that Yossarian blames Milo for the death of Mudd, the man who died as soon as he arrived in Pianosa, because Mudd's plane went down in a Milo-orchestrated engagement.

But Milo's prosperous venture is in jeopardy; in a rash effort to corner the market on cotton, he purchased the entire Egyptian crop, which he is now stuck with. Desperate for more funds, Milo hires out his planes to bomb his own squadron in Pianosa. Milo seems destined for immediate court-martial and execution, until it becomes clear just how much profit the syndicate (in which everyone has a share) made on the deal.

It is after the Avignon mission, when Yossarian refuses to wear clothing, that Milo comes to see him. The two sit in a tree, one naked and one clothed, and watch Snowden's funeral. Presiding over the affair is the chaplain, accompanied by Major Major. Milo offers Yossarian chocolate-covered cotton balls (a thinly-veiled attempt to find some way to get rid of the excess cotton), which Yossarian chokes on and spits out.

Eventually, Yossarian convinces Milo to sell his cotton to the government; and to bribe someone to facilitate the sale. Milo is at first philosophically opposed to selling to the government, and to bribery, but the thought of profit helps him to overcome his misgivings.

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