Across the horizon: the rising sun and endless possibilities
 
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z

Home - Studyworld Studynotes - Quotes - Reports & Essays 

 

STUDYWORLD STUDYNOTES:

CLASSIC LITERATURE ANALYSIS

STUDYWORLD REPORTS & ESSAYS

RESEARCH AND IDEA DATABASE




Oakwood Publishing Company:

SAT; ACT; GRE

Study Material


xx

 


Studyworld Studynotes
\Studyworld\ Studyworld Studynotes \ 1984:
Part One, Chapter Seven

Winston writes in his diary, "If there is hope it lies in the proles." They were massive enough to begin the opposition, and the Party was too strong to be overthrown from within. Winston remembers how he once thought a revolution by the proles against the Party had started, but was disappointed to learn that it was only an innocent commotion at the market. The Party claimed to have alleviated great burdens from the proles, by rescuing them from the capitalism of history, but otherwise, the Party did not concern itself too often with the proles.

Winston continues to write in his diary, about his notions of "capitalism" from the past, which the Party rose up against. He is unsure of how much is truth, if any, and admits that quite possibly all of it may have been falsified. He remembers one time, he is in a caf� sitting next to three of the last survivors of the original Revolution: Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford, who had been arrested early, reformed, and released by the Party. After Winston sees them that day, they are re-arrested and executed for their crimes. However, at his job, Winston soon comes across a photo which proves that the men could not have committed the crimes of which they were accused, but fearful that he might be guilty of thoughtcrime, Winston quickly disposes of the photo into the memory hole, lest he dig any further into this inconsistency, and struggles to keep an expressionless face. Winston is overwhelmed by the Party's overarching supremacy and writes, "Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows." Winston knows that he is writing the diary for O'Brien and is adamant in his rejection of the Party's incessant invasiveness. Winston is determined not to lose hold of the truth and swallow Party lies. Two and two make four, and nothing else.

Browse all Studyworld Studynotes

Historical Context
Main Characters
Points to Ponder
Did You Know
Plot Summary
Part One, Chapter One
Part One, Chapter Two
Part One, Chapter Three
Part One, Chapter Four
Part One, Chapter Five
Part One, Chapter Six
Part One, Chapter Seven
Part One, Chapter Eight
Part Two, Chapter One
Part Two, Chapter Two
Part Two, Chapter Three
Part Two, Chapter Four
Part Two, Chapter Five
Part Two, Chapter Six
Part Two, Chapter Seven
Part Two, Chapter Eight
Part Two, Chapter Nine
Part Two, Chapter Ten
Part Three, Chapter One
Part Three, Chapter Two
Part Three, Chapter Three
Part Three, Chapter Four
Part Three, Chapter Five
Part Three, Chapter Six


 

 



Teacher Ratings: See what

others think

of your teachers



Copy Right