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___________________________Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare


STUDYWORLD STUDYNOTES

Romeo and Juliet

Act Five, Scene One

Meanwhile, in Mantua, word of Juliet's death reaches young Romeo ahead of the Friar's messenger. Rushing to Verona, the disheartened youth pauses to purchase a vessel of poison: "Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight," he pledges.

Act Five, Scene Two

Friar John is unable to reach Romeo in Mantua. He explains to Friar Lawrence that he had been quarantined in Verona because of the suspicion of the plague.

Friar Lawrence rushes to the cemeterybecause Juliet will awaken shortly.


Act Five, Scene Three

At the Capulet's vaulted tomb, there young Romeo found Paris, also in mourning. Recognizing Romeo, he drew his sword. The two fought and Paris was fatally wounded. In the throes of death, he pled with Romeo to lay him next to his love. Romeo hesitated, then dragged the other man inside the tomb so that he too could lie near Juliet. Then, looking down at his bride, Romeo cried out...... Eyes, look your last! Arms, take your last embrace! and lips, O you ... seal with a righteous kiss a dateless bargain to engrossing death." Leaving a kiss on the beauty's silent lips, Romeo drank the poison and lay motionless by her side.

Soon, Juliet awoke - to find her husband lying next to her, dead. Hearing footsteps approaching, she unsheathed Romeo's dagger and plunged it into her breast, bewailing, "O happy dagger! ... Let me die!"

Just then the Friar enters, followed by the Montagues, the Capulets, and the Prince. Before them lies Paris, along with the limp bodies of the two lovers.

At once each family began to cast blame upon the other for the tragedy. The Friar, however, steps forward and explains the circumstances which have led to the deaths of their tender children, whose only sin was to have loved.

When he hears the story, the Prince calls out mournfully, "Where be these enemies? Capulet, Montague, see what a scourge is laid upon your hate, that heaven finds means to kill your joys with love .... All are punished."

At these words, the adversaries clasp hands in brotherhood. "A gloomy peace this morning with it brings. . . " intoned the Prince in a final note, "for never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo."



  • Biography of Willaim Shakespeare

  • About the Play

  • Quick/Fast Review

  • Character List

  • Summary of Act 1

  • Review of Act 1

  • Summary of Act 2

  • Review of Act 2

  • Summary of Act 3

  • Review of Act 3

  • Summary of Act 4

  • Review of Act 4

  • Summary of Act 5
  • Review of Act 5

  • Studyworld Essay Search on Romeo and Juliet



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