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___________________________Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare


STUDYWORLD STUDYNOTES

Romeo and Juliet

Act Two, Prologue

The Act again opens with a Prologue wherein the chorus reiterates what has ocurred.

Act Two, Scene One

The party ended, leaving Romeo outside the Capulet house, gazing up in lovesick rapture at Juliet's window. He does not answer when Benvolio calls to him.

Act Two, Scene Two

Just then, to his joy, Juliet leaned from her balcony. Romeo whispered: "But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the East, and Juliet is the sun!"

As he debates within himself whether to speak to her, she, thinking herself alone, begins to pour out her heart: "O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo? Deny thy father and refuse thy name; or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, and I'll no longer be a Capulet."

Unable to contain himself, Romeo stepped out of the shadows. Though ashamed at her overheard declaration, Juliet reconfirmed her passion, but warned him that if her family discovered him there, he would be killed. Romeo was not alarmed, "For stony limits cannot hold love out." As he swore of his love by the moon, and by his heart, Juliet begged him not to swear at all. Things were happening too fast; the world seemed suddenly brilliant and fragile "like the lightening which cloth cease to be." So, the fragile lovers exchange vows and agree to meet the next morning.

Act Two, Scene Three

On his way home, Romeo stops by the monastery to visit Friar Lawrence. He is already up and outside gathering herbs. His knowledge of their potential is a foreshadowing of events to come.

When the Friar sees Romeo, he is surprised to see him so early in the morning and greets him, "Our Romeo hath not been in bed tonight." Romeo replies, "I have been feasting with mine enemy."

He continues, "Plainly know my heart's dear love is set on the fair daughter of rich Capulet ... what thou must combine by holy marriage."

The Friar teases Romeo for his fickle nature (only yesterday he had professed undying love for Rosaline), but agrees to perform the marriage, in the hope that "this alliance may so happy prove to turn your households' rancor to pure love."

Act Two, Scene Four

The following morning, Mercutio and Benvolio are searching for Romeo; Tybalt had sent out a challenge for him to fight. But when the pair finally meet up with their enamored young kinsman, he is in no mood for fighting.

At this point Juliet's nurse comes on the scene and takes Romeo aside to demand his intentions. Romeo assures her that his love is in earnest and bids her to bring Juliet to the Friar's cell, where they would be married that afternoon.

Act Two, Scene Five

Juliet is waiting in the garden to hear what the Nurse has to say about Romeo. She finally arrives and tells Juliet that Romeo has arranged with Friar Lawrence to perform the marriage.

Act Two, Scene Six

While Romeo awaits Juliet's arrival, the Friar tells Romeo not to act too hasitly. Romeo is too happy to take any heed of the warning and the Friar performs the marriage ceremony.

 

 

  • Biography of Willaim Shakespeare

  • About the Play

  • Quick/Fast Review

  • Character List

  • Summary of Act 1

  • Review of Act 1

  • Summary of Act 2

  • Review of Act 2

  • Summary of Act 3

  • Review of Act 3

  • Summary of Act 4

  • Review of Act 4
  • Summary of Act 5

  • Review of Act 5

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