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___________________________The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger


STUDYWORLD STUDYNOTES

The Catcher in the Rye

 

Chapter Eleven:

As Holden leaves the Lavender Room he again starts to think about Jane Gallagher. He recalls how he met her and that she was the only person to whom he ever showed Allie's baseball mitt He also remembers how good he felt when he was with her.

Review:

The chapter reinforces Holden's earlier feelings about Jane Gallagher and his memories describe a sincere, emotional relationship that he experienced with her.

 

Chapter Twelve:

Still note wanting to go to sleep, Holden takes a cab to a Greenwich Village nightclub called Ernie's. On the way he again starts a conversation with the cabdriver about where the ducks go from the Central Park lagoon in the winter. The guy got angry and the conversation didn't continue.

At Ernie's, Holden listens to the piano player and drinks some Scotch and soda. He meets a girl named Lillian Simmons whom his brother D. B. used to date. In order not to have to stay with her, he leaves.

Review:

Holden continues to show his restlessness and disillusionment with people when he is at the nightclub. He finds that people are phony and boring and can't leave fast enough when he meets Lillian Simmons.

 

Chapter Thirteen:

Even though it is quite cold, Holden decides to walk back to the hotel rather than take another cab. He regrets that he doesn't have a pair of gloves and wonders who stole them from him at Pencey. He admits to being a coward because he knows that even if he knew who took them, he wouldn't do anything about it.

When he reaches the hotel, the elevator operator suggests sending him a prostitute for five dollars, and Holden accepts. While waiting in his room, he again calls himself a coward because he is still a virgin.

The girl is young, not very attractive, and has a squeaky voice. When she takes off her dress, Holden loses his nerve and makes up a story as to why he can't have sex with her. She tries to seduce him, questions his age, and then gives up. Holden pays her anyway but she is not satisfied with the amount and leaves in anger.

Review:

Holden's attempt at being with Sunny represents another attempt at seeking companionship even on a superficial level. His encounter with the prostitute depicts a need to give vent to his sexual drive, yet being unable to find fulfillment in an artificial setting.

 

Chapter Fourteen:

After Sunny leaves, Holden finally gets undressed and goes to bed. He is suddenly awakened by a knock. He opens the door and is confronted by Maurice and Sunny who came back to collect the extra five dollars that Sunny had demanded. Holden tries to refuse but is knocked to the ground when Maurice slugs him. Sunny takes the money and she and Maurice leave the room.

Review:

Holden displays a lack of maturity when he begins to argue about the five dollars with Maurice. This encounter pushes Holden further into feeling isolated and angry at the world. He also displays his immaturity when he breaks down and cries after Maurice takes the money.

 

Chapter Fifteen:

In the morning, Holden calls Sally Hayes and makes a date with her to go to a matinee. After signing out of the hotel, he checks his belongings in a locker at Grand Central Station and goes to eat breakfast. In the luncheonette he meets some nuns with whom he strikes up a conversation. They start to talk about Romeo and Juliet and Holden is surprised that they would know about it. He donates ten dollars to one of their charities and is sorry that he did afterwards.

Review:

Even though Holden has had an unpleasant experience the previous night, he doesn't change his ways. His encounter with the nuns changes his stereotyped understanding of organized religion. He also is surprised that they don't seem to have the phoniness that he feels exists in the world.

  • Biography of J.D. Salinger

  • Quick/Fast Review

  • Character List

  • About the Catcher in the Rye

  • Comprehensive Summary and Review of Chapters 1-5

  • Comprehensive Summary and Review of Chapters 6-10

  • Comprehensive Summary and Review of Chapters 11-15

  • Comprehensive Summary and Review of Chapters 16-20

  • Comprehensive Summary and Review of Chapters 21-26

  • Studyworld Essay Search on The Catcher In The Rye

     

     

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