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CLASSIC LITERATURE ANALYSIS

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Reports & Essays: Literature - Shakespeare

"AND""OR"


Hamlet's Speech as a Window to His Madness
Hamlet the young Danish prince is possibly one of the most complicated characters in English Literature. Shakespeare created a three-dimensional and multifaceted individual, whose constant vacillations and "pregnant" soliloquies ask the most significant questions that life has to offer. Hamlet has the reader in a constant guessing game trying to decipher whether or not Hamlet is truly insane. Why does Hamlet feign madness? Is he truly even feigning? If he is mad, was Polonius accurate in saying that there was a "method to his madness"? Hamlet's speech is the portal into his soul, in which we find the answers to all our questions about him. Both in his soliloquies and in his heavy dialogue he gives us clues to his intentions, his purpose, and the strongest enemy: his self. "How strange or odd some'or I bear myself (As I perchance hereafter shall think meet to put an antic disposition on) That you, at such times seeing me, never shall, with arms encumbered thus, or this headshake... Or such ambiguous giving out, to note that you know aught of me - this do swear..."

"For complete summary and analysis of literary works, please visit NovelGuide.com

 



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