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Harriet Tubman
A savior to many black people in the 1800's. Harriet Tubman was born in 1821 as a slave in Maryland. After hearing that her master's estate was to be sold, she escaped to freedom. Learning the way's and experiencing freedom first hand, she yearned to give other black people the same gift she has. She knew that her efforts would require money and therefore she worked part-time jobs until she had enough money for her first mission. The first rescue she made, was to free her sister and her two children. Next, she made fifteen trips to other places and saved another 200 people. Her work was known as the Underground Railroad. Now, more blacks would be able to experience the joy of freedom! Harriet's work was supported by many of the leading abolitionists who helped her with money, supplies and shelter. They gave her a place to stay, for there was a reward out for her head. During the civil war Harriet volunteered as a spy and a scout in South Carolina, often she would bring back information from slaves who still lived behind the Southern Borders. After the war she returned to Auburn New York, an area where abolitionism and women's rights had long been popular and where she had bought a home. For her long hard work, Harriet Tubman received a medal from Queen Victoria of England, who was also against slavery. Harriet Tubman, a strong and caring woman who brought the wonders of freedom to many African Americans. She risked her life to save family and hundreds of other slaves. Her construction of the Underground Railroad was a marvel at it's best. Supported by Quakers, and Abolitionists, she brought a sense of relief to many broken hearts. I think she is an example for all of us, and is important for all to know how much of an impact she made in the present. Tuban was loved by many, and John Brown refers to her in his letters as "one of the best and bravest persons on this continent--General Tubman as we call her"(Internet, Tuban).

 



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